Panic Disorder: People with panic disorder have panic attacks with feelings of terror that strike suddenly and repeatedly with no warning. During the attacks, individuals may feel like they can't breathe, have lost control, are having a heart attack or even that they are dying. Physical symptoms may include chest pain, dizziness, nausea, sweating, tingling or numbness, and a racing heartbeat. Some people will have one isolated attack, while others will develop a long term panic disorder; either way, there is often high anxiety between attacks because there is no way of knowing when the next one will occur. Panic disorders often begin early in adulthood. Many people with panic disorder also suffer from agoraphobia (abnormal fear of open or public places.). See more on Panic Attacks.
This disorder is characterized by panic attacks and sudden feelings of terror sometimes striking repeatedly and without warning. Often mistaken for a heart attack, a panic attack causes powerful physical symptoms including chest pain, heart palpitations, dizziness, shortness of breath and stomach upset. Many people will go to desperate measures to avoid an attack, including social isolation.
For example, a person with obsessive-compulsive disorder may experience a panic attack when their schedule or compulsions are interrupted. Individuals who struggle with specific phobias are also susceptible to panic attacks. A person with an extreme fear of heights (acrophobia) may experience a panic attack in a penthouse apartment. And for someone with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), a condition characterized by extreme fear or worry, the unending anxiety can escalate to a panic attack. People with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have a higher incidence of panic disorder than the general population.  Illness or traumatic events increase the chances of panic attacks.
“Panic disorder is diagnosed if the individual has recurrent panic attacks (minimum four in a four-week period), and at least one of the attacks is accompanied by one or more physical symptoms, including persistent concern about having another attack, worry about the implication or consequences of the attack (i.e., having a heart attack), and/or a significant change in behaviour due to the attacks, such as quitting a job.7 In addition, the panic attacks cannot be due to the physiological effects of a substance or another general medical condition.”[1]
I’ve had a lot of these symptoms and I know I also have depression. These anxiety attack’s come at the worst of times, when I work and I can’t get my mind focused back into what I need to do. I’m only 19 years old, but I’ve been to hell & back. Serving in the U.S.Marines to now, back home not doing anything I love after I got discharged. I feel lost and I haven’t got my life back together yet. I don’t have anyone to depend on besides my brother who is a Marine now, stationed 1000 miles away. I haven’t been able to establish myself well, since. I do have a wonderful girlfriend I love dearly and we have been together 2-years, traveling with me and moving near me. I’ve come home and things just feel like they’re slipping away. I was trained to not stress and be calm in the worst situations. But, even as a Marine, things can get very hard and wear on my mind. I thought nothing would be worse than Parris Island, but I am wrong. Life has been beating me down. I lost my car because someone sold me a stolen car and I feel like I’ve lost motivation to do my job; Walking and hitching rides to work to make best I can do. If there’s anyone that’s older that can give me some advice, that would be great. Because I don’t have a lot of people, my brother is not here, and I just need something. I want to do nothing but great things in this life. It’s just been hard to deal with lately and I’m losing hope. These anxiety attacks are slowly killing me. It’s every second of every-single-day.
I started crying and could barley breathe then i started getting butterflies in my stomach I had a bad headache and I felt weak and shaky I haven’t been diagnosed with anything because I don’t tell people about it only my really close friend…anytime something goes wrong I feel like I’m going to cry maybe I’m just an emotional person but idk any suggestions?

Occasional anxiety is an expected part of life. You might feel anxious when faced with a problem at work, before taking a test, or before making an important decision. But anxiety disorders involve more than temporary worry or fear. For a person with an anxiety disorder, the anxiety does not go away and can get worse over time. The symptoms can interfere with daily activities such as job performance, school work, and relationships.
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